Texture Analysis Professionals Blog

How to measure and analyse the texture of food, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and adhesives.

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

Physical Analysis: Putting Cosmetics to the Test

A customer walks into a pharmacy looking for a new cream to keep their hands soft. They don’t have much to go by other than packaging and price, so they choose the same brand they use on their face. 


They get outside and squeeze some out of the tube with their normal pressure, and their palm fills up with too much thin, watery cream that seems to do nothing to remove the dryness. A disappointed customer, and the very reason the cosmetics company should have used physical analysis on their cream before they released it for sale.

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Chips, Crisps & Mash – Getting the Texture Right!

Potatoes are a common, even basic, vegetable in Western diets, in some cases assuming the status of a staple.

Potato snack foods include French Fries and dried miniature versions of them (chips in the US sense, or crisps in UK) in many flavours. They appear as mashed potato in many convenience meals such as TV dinners, and as potato salads in take-away meals.

Tuesday, 14 March 2017


Adding Texture to Tea



The best discoveries are total accidents, and bubble tea is no exception. 


The drink as we know it today found its origins in Taiwan in 1988 when Lin Hsiu Hui, a product developer in a tea house, decided on a whim to pour her tapioca pudding into her iced tea. 


Perhaps excited by the extra level of texture she had incorporated into her drink, she passed it around the meeting room and it was met with acclaim; the product was tweaked and brought onto the market, and its sales rocketed. 

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Texture Analysis in the Nailcare Industry: 5: Tensile properties of nail wraps

Self-adhesive nail wraps can be tricky to fit to the nail. To avoid ripples in the surface, the film must be flexible enough to be smoothed into small corners but also taut across the surface of the nail. 

The wrap must also be tough enough to avoid tearing during application and have a reasonable strength. All these properties can be assessed using a tensile test. 


Tuesday, 28 February 2017

Texture Analysis in the Nailcare Industry: 4: 
Adhesive properties of nail wraps

Nail wraps are flexible adhesive films that are smoothed onto the nail’s surface and trimmed. 

They provide an opportunity for intricate designs that can be printed by the manufacturer that would otherwise be difficult to paint by hand. 

The design will be consistent across all nails and removes the difficulty of using the non-dominant hand to paint.


Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Texture Analysis in the Nailcare Industry: 3: Mechanical properties of dry polish



A manicure is subject to a lot of abuse as the wearer goes about their daily life (opening jars, cooking, typing on a keyboard). 

For repeat purchase of a nail polish, it must be able to stand up to this type of use. As well as the adhesion properties mentioned above, the stiffness and toughness of a polish are all extremely important. 


An overly stiff, brittle polish would be undesirable as it would break when a nail is bent when opening a soda can, for example. The low stiffness is important for the polish to follow the nail as it bends. A high strain to failure is also crucial, or the polish film would break under the slightest deformation.

Tuesday, 14 February 2017

Texture Analysis in the Nailcare Industry: 
2: Nail polish drying time



Nail polish has been developed to have a faster drying time with brands claiming “dry in 60 seconds” or “quickdry”. 

However, smudging a manicure is still a common complaint. There are also difficulties accelerating the drying time of more natural polishes containing fewer volatile solvents. New products must be tested for this in a consistent way.




Tuesday, 7 February 2017

Texture Analysis in the Nailcare Industry: 1: 

Introduction

The way we look and feel is more important than ever in the age of constant selfie-taking and the abundance of cameras at every social gathering.

This is not to mention the impossible beauty standards set by photoshopped billboards and magazine shoots that ordinary people feel they have to live up to. 

It is no surprise that cosmetics are more popular than ever, with the global cosmetic market estimated to reach US$675 billion by 2020.